Copyright

Copyright protection exists from the moment a work is created in a fixed, tangible form of expression. The copyright immediately becomes the property of the author who created the work. Only the author, or those deriving their rights through the author, can rightfully claim copyright. In the case of works made for hire, the employer—not the writer—is considered the author. Here you will find FindLaw's collection of Copyright articles, part of the Intellectual Property section of the Corporate Counsel Center. The articles in this archive are predominantly written by lawyers for a professional audience seeking business solutions to legal issues. Start your free research with FindLaw.

Intellectual Property
Copyright Articles
    • Copyright Form Letter: Games
      GAMES The idea for a game is not protected by copyright. The same is true of the name or title given to the game and of the method or methods for playing it. Copyright protects only the particular manner of an author's expression in literary ...

      Read More »

    • Copyright Form Letter: International Copyright
      There is no such thing as an "international copyright" that will automatically protect an author's writings throughout the world. Protection against unauthorized use in a particular country basically depends on the national laws of that country ...

      Read More »

    • Why And How You Should Copyright Your Web Site
      Several clients have sought our advice in combating and attempting to remove or shut down so-called "copycat web sites." Their experiences are all very similar: they have invested a considerable amount of time and effort in designing a web site for ...

      Read More »

    • Current Copyright Issues
      A copyright protects only original works of "authorship" included in the following seven categories: (1) Literary works (including computer programs), (2) Musical works, including any accompanying words, (3) Dramatic works, including any ...

      Read More »

    • Decoding the Value of Software
      Although it may consist of thousands of lines of coded instructions, and be small enough to burn onto a single CD, the software owned by a business might be its most valuable asset, its lifeblood, and a key driver of the value of the organization ...

      Read More »

    • Hanging Copyrighted Paintings as Props in Movie Was Fair Use
      Plaintiff, an African-American artist, sued Warner Bros. ("Warner") for copyright infringement based on the use of two copyrighted paintings as props in the movie Made in America. The paintings were displayed in the living room of Sarah, a character ...

      Read More »

    • Copyright Infringement Risks
      A replacement general contractor and replacement architect on the renovation of a single-family residence were recently held jointly and severally liable to the "original architect" for $107,125 in damages for copyright infringement. While copyright ...

      Read More »

    • Uncertainty About Perfection Of Security Interest in a Copyright Or: Better Safe Than Sorry
      In World Aerotechnology Corporation v. Silicon Valley Bank (In re World Auxiliary Power Company), a bankruptcy court in the Northern District of California recently held that the manner of perfecting a security interest in a copyright varies ...

      Read More »

    • Icann's New Top-Level Domains Pose Problems and Offer Opportunities for Trademark Owners
      ICANN's recently approved top-level domains (.biz, .info, .pro, .name, .museum, .coop and .aero) provide cybersquatters with new opportunities to misappropriate others' trademarks. These new domains may also offer registered trademark owners the ...

      Read More »

    • Photocopying and the Fair Use Doctrine
      The Copyright Act gives the owner of copyrighted material the right to control its duplication and distribution and prohibits photocopying unless the copying falls within one of the limited exceptions provided for in the Act. For most businesses and ...

      Read More »