Copyright

Copyright protection exists from the moment a work is created in a fixed, tangible form of expression. The copyright immediately becomes the property of the author who created the work. Only the author, or those deriving their rights through the author, can rightfully claim copyright. In the case of works made for hire, the employer—not the writer—is considered the author. Here you will find FindLaw's collection of Copyright articles, part of the Intellectual Property section of the Corporate Counsel Center. The articles in this archive are predominantly written by lawyers for a professional audience seeking business solutions to legal issues. Start your free research with FindLaw.

Intellectual Property
Copyright Articles
    • Copyright Form Letter: International Copyright
      There is no such thing as an "international copyright" that will automatically protect an author's writings throughout the world. Protection against unauthorized use in a particular country basically depends on the national laws of that country ...

      Read More »

    • Copyright Form Letter: Games
      GAMES The idea for a game is not protected by copyright. The same is true of the name or title given to the game and of the method or methods for playing it. Copyright protects only the particular manner of an author's expression in literary ...

      Read More »

    • Delivery and Acceptance of a Manuscript
      You've just received a manuscript from an author, and your editor after reading the manuscript is disappointed by the manuscript's quality and contents. Not only is it poorly written, but also the research is incomplete and the text is not from the ...

      Read More »

    • Resale Royalties in the United States for Fine Visual Artists: An Alien Concept
      I. INTRODUCTIONOn December 1, 1990, President Bush signed into law the Visual Artists Rights Act of 1990, which was generally effective on June 1, 1991, and extends to visual artists the federal moral rights of attribution and integrity. The ...

      Read More »

    • Patent FAQ
      About 17 years depending on the type of patent and prosecution history. How long does a federal trademark last? A trademark is renewable as many times as the trademark owner desires. How long does a copyright last? About 95 years. How many patents ...

      Read More »

    • Hanging Copyrighted Paintings as Props in Movie Was Fair Use
      Plaintiff, an African-American artist, sued Warner Bros. ("Warner") for copyright infringement based on the use of two copyrighted paintings as props in the movie Made in America. The paintings were displayed in the living room of Sarah, a character ...

      Read More »

    • City Attorney Owns Any Copyright in Computer Program
      Plaintiff, an attorney in the Law Department of the City of Detroit (City), sued the City for infringement of his copyright in a computer program. Plaintiff developed the program using Professional File, a commercially available data management and ...

      Read More »

    • Patent, Trademark, and Trade Secret
      While copyright law is the most important intellectual property law for the Internet, you need to know enough about patent, trademark, and trade secret law to avoid infringing intellectual property rights owned by others and to be able to take ...

      Read More »

    • What Constitutes Authorship of a Computer Program for Purposes of Copyright?
      A recent decision by the U.S. Second Circuit Court of Appeals raises the question of who is the author of a computer program when a programmer writes code under the supervision of another person to carry out that person's design to modify ...

      Read More »

    • The Year 2000 Copyright Maze
      Year 2000 Journal, Vol. 1, No. 2 (1997) Now that the staggering costs most companies face to make their computer systems Year 2000 compliant have begun to sink in, smart companies should be conducting a careful legal audit of their licenses and ...

      Read More »