Copyright

Copyright protection exists from the moment a work is created in a fixed, tangible form of expression. The copyright immediately becomes the property of the author who created the work. Only the author, or those deriving their rights through the author, can rightfully claim copyright. In the case of works made for hire, the employer—not the writer—is considered the author. Here you will find FindLaw's collection of Copyright articles, part of the Intellectual Property section of the Corporate Counsel Center. The articles in this archive are predominantly written by lawyers for a professional audience seeking business solutions to legal issues. Start your free research with FindLaw.

Intellectual Property
Copyright Articles
    • An Introduction To Copyrights
      *Patricia Smink Rogowski is a partner in the Wilmington, Delaware law firm Connolly Bove Lodge & Hutz LLP. Ms. Rogowski is a graduate of Lehigh University (B.S.M.E., with highest honors) and the University of Pennsylvania Law School (J.D.). James M ...

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    • Copyright Form Letter: Games
      GAMES The idea for a game is not protected by copyright. The same is true of the name or title given to the game and of the method or methods for playing it. Copyright protects only the particular manner of an author's expression in literary ...

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    • Copyright Form Letter: International Copyright
      There is no such thing as an "international copyright" that will automatically protect an author's writings throughout the world. Protection against unauthorized use in a particular country basically depends on the national laws of that country ...

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    • Bankruptcy's Impact on Copyrighted Software Licenses
      When a company goes into bankruptcy, the bankruptcy laws make available to it a series of special tools not otherwise available to companies outside of bankruptcy. These tools are designed either to give the debtor a chance to reorganize its ...

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    • Copyright Not Allowed on Computer Program's Menu Structure
      In August 1996, the Federal Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit decided MiTek Holdings, Inc. v. Arce Engineering Co., a case of first impression in that circuit, and held that the menu and submenu command tree structures ("menu structures") of ...

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    • City Attorney Owns Any Copyright in Computer Program
      Plaintiff, an attorney in the Law Department of the City of Detroit (City), sued the City for infringement of his copyright in a computer program. Plaintiff developed the program using Professional File, a commercially available data management and ...

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    • Complying With Your Own Copyright?
      Associations regularly create copyrighted matters as a part of their menu of products and services. Oftentimes, however, the authorship is not realized nor does the association comply with the federal law of mandatory deposit. Copyright compliance ...

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    • Copyright Form Letter: Fair Use
      One of the rights accorded to the owner of copyright is the right to reproduce or to authorize others to reproduce the work in copies or phonorecords. This right is subject to certain limitations found in sections 107 through 120 of the copyright ...

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    • What's Mine Is Mine: Impact of Copyright Law on Ownership of Design Professionals' Plans
      "First, it seems odd, bordering on obtuse, for an architect to retain counsel wholly inexperienced in copyright matters, especially given the fact that every AIA contract contains provisions about copyright ownership." U.S. Circuit Judge Batchelder ...

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    • What is Intellectual Property?: Copyright and the Public Domain
      Intellectual Property is the group of legal rights in things that people create or invent. Intellectual property rights include patent, copyright, trademark and trade secret rights. In Europe and some other countries, "moral rights", which are ...

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