Patent

A patent for an invention is the grant of a property right to the inventor, issued by the United States Patent and Trademark Office. Generally, the term of a new patent is 20 years from the date on which the application for the patent was filed in the United States or, in special cases, from the date an earlier related application was filed, subject to the payment of maintenance fees. This is FindLaw's collection of Patent articles, part of the Intellectual Property section of the Corporate Counsel Center. Law articles in this archive are predominantly written by lawyers for a professional audience seeking business solutions to legal issues. Start your free research with FindLaw.

Intellectual Property
Patent Articles
    • Software Patents: What does "Means" Mean?
      This article was originally published in the Spring 2004 edition (Vol. 4, No. 1) of Thelen Reid's Intellectual Property and Trade Regulation Journal. Every patent has one or more claims that define the legal scope of protection afforded by the ...

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    • Spotting Sweet-Sounding Promises of Fraudulent Invention Promotion Firms
      Think you've got a great idea for a new product or service? You're not alone. Every year, tens of thousands of people try to develop their ideas and market them commercially. Some people try to sell their idea or invention to a manufacturer that ...

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    • Staking A Claim In The Nanoworld
      Nanotechnology is an emerging field that concerns the development and use of compositions of matter that generally have a size of between 1 and 100 nanometers, a "nanometer" being one billionth of a meter. At such small sizes, the compositions take ...

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    • Protect Your Idea
      If the search does not turn up any prior art that would prevent the patenting of the invention, the inventor may now decide to proceed with the preparation and filing of the patent application. The application will include the specification, the ...

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    • Provisional Application For Patent: What It Is and How to Use It
      Since June 8, 1995, the U. S. Patent and Trademark Office (PTO) has offered inventors the option of filing a provisional application for patent which was designed to provide a lower cost first patent filing in the United States and to give U.S ...

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    • Patent Trends in Nanotechnology
      The publication of patent applications by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) provides a means of following new developments in a field of interest. One such field of interest is nanotechnology, and reviewing some of the published ...

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    • Provisional Patent Applications
      Since June of 1995, it has been possible to file a new kind of patent application in the Patent and Trademark Office. This application is called a "provisional" patent application. A provisional application stands in contrast with a "regular" patent ...

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    • PTO Issues Final Utility Guidelines
      The PTO has now issued what it terms the "final version" of the Utility Examination Guidelines to be used by Examiners in their review of patent applications for compliance with the utility requirements, together with an extensive "underlying ...

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    • PTO Issues Proposed Guidelines for Examination of Computer Implemented Inventions
      In response to recent decisions from the Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit, the PTO has now issued Proposed Guidelines for examination of computer-implemented inventions. In its Proposed Guidelines, the PTO has explicitly stated that any ...

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    • PTO Rejects Federal Circuit Decision, In Re Baird
      In a highly unusual action, the PTO issued a Notice to Examiners on March 29, 1994 (1161 O.G. 314, No. 3, April 19, 1994), directing them to disregard In re Baird, 29 USPQ2d 1550 (Fed. Cir. 1994) in assessing obviousness under 35 USC 103. In Baird ...

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