Civil Procedure

This is FindLaw's collection of Civil Procedure articles, part of the Litigation and Disputes section of the Corporate Counsel Center. It is the body of law surrounding procedural rules detailing how the court will handle a civil case. Civil procedure is a set of rules that help determine what pleas, orders and motions are allowed, as well as how to handle depositions and discovery. The Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, adopted by the US federal court in 1938, has been used by most states. Law articles in this archive are predominantly written by lawyers for a professional audience seeking business solutions to legal issues. Start your free research with FindLaw.

Civil Procedure Articles
    • Tips When Testifying

      Being questioned under oath by the other side, whether at trial or at deposition, will be most productive if you follow some basic principles: Tell the truth. Testimony is made up of questions and answers. Even more important than articulating the ...

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    • Second Opinion or Cocktail Party Advice?

      It is frequently true that attorney's opinions are based upon areas of uncertainty or ambiguity. Take for instance an attorney who is asked to express an opinion regarding the possibility of victory in a piece of civil litigation. In order to draw ...

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    • The Business of Litigation Support
      Litigation support, it turns out, is no more confined to expert witness testimony than the solar system is to Earth. Earth is what we know most about and it's where our understanding begins. However, everything doesn't revolve around us and we're ...

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    • Texas Litigation: Stages of a Lawsuit
      When most people think of the American legal system, they probably think of a courtroom where lawyers argue their cases to the jury under the auspices of a judge. The media and entertainment industry has bombarded the viewing public with dramatic ...

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    • Terazosin Hydrochloride Antitrust Litigation
      In what has become known as the Hytrin generic drug patent antitrust litigation, the 11th Circuit recently vacated certification of the class because of the potential for significant conflict among class members. Specifically, the court held that ...

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    • Tax and Estate Planning for the Nouveaux Riches
      One of the most enduring stereotypes in the legal profession, as well as in the public mind, is that of the private client solicitor. We are all familiar with the almost Dickensian image of the kindly practitioner who attended to the wills, estates ...

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    • The Attorney-Client Privilege: Slicing The Lines of Distinction More Thinly
      The significant cases decided in the attorney-client privilege area in the last year or so clearly reflect an evolution in judicial thinking. Unlike in the majority of decisions in the past, the current approach by the courts is to slice the line of ...

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    • Second Circuit Reversal Regarding Disney's Fantasia On Videocassettes
      The Second Circuit, in a significant, well-reasoned opinion by Judge Pierre Leval, reversed the district court for the Southern District of New York regarding Disney's release in 1991 of Fantasia in video format. Boosey & Hawkes Music Publishers ...

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    • Screening a Medical Malpractice Case: A Practical Approach
      This is the first article of a three part series focusing on case management through litigation and trial. In this article, the authors concentrate on the importance of the initial client interview and its use as a vehicle to successfully resolving ...

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    • Records Retention: The Need for a Good Corporate Policy

      We've heard about records retention and the trouble that shredding documents can bring. But are you aware that the law penalizes document modification as well? Take the Arthur Andersen case as an example. In August 2001, questions arose regarding ...

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