Criminal Litigation

This is FindLaw's collection of Criminal Litigation articles, part of the Litigation and Disputes section of the Corporate Counsel Center. Criminal litigation refers to a trial in criminal court. Criminal litigation is distinct from civil litigation in most countries. Civil litigation is a private lawsuit between two parties, while criminal litigation is litigation brought by the state against an individual. Criminal trials require the highest standard of proof, which means the prosecutor must prove all elements of the crime beyond a reasonable doubt. Law articles in this archive are predominantly written by lawyers for a professional audience seeking business solutions to legal issues. Start your free research with FindLaw.

Criminal Litigation Articles
    • The First Step in an Appeal: Keeping Track Of Error During the Trial

      "This post-trial motion has been prepared without the benefit of a transcript of the trial proceedings. The plaintiff/defendant hereby incorporates all other allegations of error which have not been specifically noted in this motion." All ...

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    • The Federal Sentencing Guidelines: A Formulaic and Impersonal Approach to Dispensing Justice

      On October 12, 1984, President Ronald Reagan signed the Comprehensive Crime Control Bill into law. This bill included the Sentencing Reform Act of 1984, which called for the creation of the ...

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    • Texas Litigation: Stages of a Lawsuit
      When most people think of the American legal system, they probably think of a courtroom where lawyers argue their cases to the jury under the auspices of a judge. The media and entertainment industry has bombarded the viewing public with dramatic ...

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    • Self-Representation: The Perils of Pro Se

      Are you thinking of representing yourself or your business in litigation without an attorney? Or, have you been involved in a lawsuit in which the other side was self-represented? These are both examples of pro se representation, a practice in which ...

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    • Search and Seizure: What Are Your Rights?

      When a police officer serves a search warrant or stops someone in the street and frisks him, certain fundamental constitutional rights are involved.

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    • Proposition 213

      On November 6, 1996, the people of the State of California passed Proposition 213. The provisions of Proposition 213 are embodied in the Civil Code Sections 3333.3 and 3333.4. Civil Code Section 3333.3 prohibits a person from recovering any damages ...

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    • Proper Handling of the "Rambo" Litigator

      We’ve all encountered what I refer to as the “Rambo” Litigator. John Rambo, of course, was the slightly psychotic, yet heroic, war veteran played by Sylvester Stallone in a series of action movies in the 1980s. Rambo generally responded to ...

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    • Private Litigation Addressing Corporate Campaign Activity

      According to Ray Rogers, who is generally recognized as the "father" of corporate campaigns, a corporate campaign against a company "has a beginning at point A and an end at point Z. Point Z is the total defeat or annihilation of your adversary ...

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    • New Ignition Interlock Law in Illinois

      A conviction for driving under the influence (DUI) in Illinois can result in serious consequences. Now, however, individuals who are just arrested for DUI in Illinois for their first offense face serious penalties. A new Illinois DUI law, one of the toughest in the United States, took effect on January 1, 2009.

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    • Neutral Evaluation: An ADR Technique Whose Time Has Come

      Mediation and arbitration get all the ink in the ADR press, but more and more "neutral evaluation" is becoming the ADR technique of choice. For certain types of cases, or at certain points in the life of a case, neutral evaluation can often be a better choice than mediation or arbitration.

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