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Published: 2008-03-26

Domestic Violence And The Law



A PRACTICAL GUIDE FOR SURVIVORS

Published By
The Young Lawyers Section
of
The Missouri Bar

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Introduction

What is Domestic Violence Under the Law?

  1. Physical Abuse Against You
  2. Emotional Abuse
  3. Child Abuse

How Does the Law Protect Against Domestic Violence?

  1. Civil Relief
  2. Child Abuse Complaint
  3. Criminal Charges

How Can A Victim of Domestic Violence Get Help?

  1. Call the Police
  2. Pursue Your Civil and Criminal Remedies

What is the Difference Between Civil and Criminal Remedies?

How Do You Pursue Your Civil Remedies?

  1. Know What Kind of Relief is Available
  2. Consider Your Children's Safety
  3. Go to Court for Immediate Protection and Relief
  4. Be Prepared for the Hearing for Full Order of Protection
  5. Extend Your Court Order Before It Expires
  6. Abide by the Order
  7. Get the Order Enforced if the Abuser Violates the Order

Tips and Pointers

  1. File Civil and Criminal Charges Simultaneously
  2. Stay with Relatives or at a Shelter
  3. Go to the Hospital if You Are Injured
  4. Seek Counseling
  5. Be Organized in Court
  6. Your Word is Good Evidence
  7. Provide for Your Financial Security
  8. Call a Lawyer for Help with the System

How Does A Victim of Domestic Violence Pursue Criminal Remedies?

  1. Report the Crime as Soon as Possible
  2. Be Prepared to Tell What Happened
  3. Know the Crimes and Charges
    • Rape and Sexual Offense
    • Assault
    • Communicating Threats - Harassment
    • Stalking
    • Harassing Phone Calls
  4. Be Prepared for the Criminal Trial
  5. Tips and Pointers

How Can An Elderly Victim of Violence Get Help?

  1. What is Elder Abuse?
  2. How Does the Law Protect the Elderly?

Domestic Violence Resources

INTRODUCTION

Domestic violence may be physical oremotional: slapping, punching, beating, kicking,threats of harm and verbal abuse are all forms ofdomestic violence. Violent behavior toward othersis wrong no matter who does it. Family membersare not excused. If you are in an abusive situationand don't do something to stop it, you may beharming your family. There is evidence thatchildren raised in abusive homes are likely tobecome abusers or victims of abuse in later life.

Q: WHAT IS DOMESTIC VIOLENCE UNDER THE LAW?

1. Physical Abuse Against You.

The legal definition of domestic violenceincludes: causing you physical harm (hitting,kicking, slapping, throwing things, etc.) orthreatening physical harm (with or without aweapon), coercing you to do something or refrainfrom doing something by threats or use of force,harassing you (causing emotional distress bylingering at your home, peering in windows,following you, etc.), forcing or attempting to forceyou to engage in any sexual act, or holding youagainst your will.

2. Emotional Abuse.

Domestic violence also includes placing aparty in fear of imminent serious bodily harm bythreat of force. This includes threats of violence; orother conduct that would cause a reasonable personto suffer substantial emotional distress, like "I willhit you", "if you leave, I will hurt you," or "if youtell anyone, I will kill you," so long as the actactually causes substantial emotional distress.

3. Child Abuse.

The law provides for protection againstviolence toward children as well. Child abuse isany physical injury, sexual abuse or emotional harminflicted on a child other than by accidental meansby an adult household member. This includessexual abuse of children, such as fondling or rape.The abused children need not be the children of theabuser in order for you to file a child abuse petition.The law does, however, exempt disciplineadministered in a reasonable manner.

Q: HOW DOES THE LAW PROTECT AGAINST DOMESTIC VIOLENCE?

1. You can file for CIVIL RELIEF in the civil courts if you are:
  • The spouse or former spouse of the abuser;
  • Being stalked or harassed by any person;
  • Have a child in common with the abuser;
  • The current or former live-in girlfriend or boyfriend of the abuser; or
  • Related by blood or marriage to the abuser.
2. You can and should file a Child Protection Order if:
  • You suspect child abuse is occurring.
3. You can bring CRIMINAL CHARGES if:
  • You have suffered violence in an abusive relationship, regardless of whether you are married to or living with the abuser.

Q: HOW CAN A VICTIM OF DOMESTIC VIOLENCE GET HELP?

1. Call The Police

If you are a victim of domestic violence, youcan call the police or county sheriff for help. Thelaw requires the police to provide you with:

  • ADVICE

Law enforcement officers are trained toknow and be able to tell you where the closesttemporary shelters for domestic violence victims arelocated. If you are hurt, in need of food, clothing orcounseling, the police can direct you to theappropriate community resource.

  • TRANSPORTATION

Law enforcement officers can and shouldtake you where you need to go to get help, whetherit be the home of a friend or family member, shelteror hospital. The police can also take you to theprosecuting attorney's office if you want to file acriminal complaint. In all cases of domesticviolence, leave the house, take your children withyou, and bring your important things if this cansafely be accomplished.

  • EMERGENCY ASSISTANCE

Law enforcement officers are authorized bylaw to do whatever is reasonable to protect youfrom harm. The police can arrest the abuser if theyhave good reason to believe that the abuser has hurtyou. They have an obligation to arrest the abuser ifthey reasonably believe the abuser has violated acourt order by hurting you or coming to your house.

When you call the police . . .

If you call the police twice within a 12-hourperiod, the police must arrest the abuser on thesecond visit.

  • BE READY TO PROTECT YOURSELF FROM HARM FOR AT LEAST A SHORT WHILE.

The police are only required to respond toyour call as soon as practicable.

  • COLLECT EVIDENCE THAT YOU HAVE BEEN BEATEN OR THREATENED.

When the police arrive, show them torn orbloody clothing, broken items or any other evidenceof an attack (if you have any). Be sure to give thepolice the names and phone numbers of allwitnesses to your attack, if there are any. If there isa court order that the abuser has violated, give thepolice a copy of it so they can arrest the abuser forviolating the order. Do not give them your onlycopy, as you will be disadvantaged should you needto call the police again and do not have a courtorder to show them. You should also give thepolice a copy of separation or divorce papers, ifthere are any.

  • ASK THE POLICE TO MAKE A REPORT OF THE INCIDENT.

Ask the police to take pictures of yourinjuries and to conduct an investigation. Youshould ask for the police officer's name and badgenumber so that he/she can be a witness for you inany civil or criminal proceeding you may bringagainst your abuser. Write this information down soyou can report it to the prosecuting attorney if youpursue a criminal complaint.

  • PREPARE TO TAKE YOUR ABUSER TO COURT.

If you do not pursue your civil remedies andalso fail to press criminal charges against yourabuser, the police may (although they should not)become less likely to help you in the future. Inaddition, your abuser may believe that he/she canget away with hurting you. Be prepared to takeyour abuser to court, whether it be civil, criminal orboth.

2. Pursue Your Civil and Criminal Remedies.

To get started, you can contact:

  • CLERK OF COURT. Go to your local clerk of court's office to file a request for a petition for a protective order. A local domestic violence assistance agency may be able to assist you in preparing these forms, if not the court clerk with assist you.

  • PROSECUTOR. If the police officer does not pursue criminal charges against your abuser, see the local Prosecutor yourself and pursue a criminal complaint.

  • DOMESTIC VIOLENCE CENTER AND/ OR ATTORNEY. For more help and advice, contact an attorney or local domestic violence assistance organization. The police may also direct you to these organizations. This book contains a complete list of all the resources available in the State of Missouri at the end of the text.

Q: WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN CIVIL & CRIMINAL REMEDIES?

The purpose of a criminal action is to punishthe abuser. The purpose of a civil action is to getcertain types of relief for you from the domesticviolence which has and may again be inflictedagainst you. Civil cases are not a part of anabuser's criminal records. You do not need todecide between civil and criminal remedies Ä youmay pursue both remedies for the same incident ofdomestic violence.

Q: HOW DO YOU PURSUE YOUR CIVIL REMEDIES?

1. Know What Kind of Relief is Available.

You can request and may be able to get thecourt to order:

  • the abuser not assault, threaten, harass or contact you;
  • possession of the residence so that the abuser cannot return there and/or an order that he/she leave the residence;
  • suitable housing other than the former residence;
  • law enforcement assistance in evicting the abuser from the residence and/or in returning you to it;
  • custody of minor children;
  • child support;
  • visitation;
  • payments for your support if you and the abuser are married (most judges will only award this if compelling circumstances exist);
  • possession of a vehicle;
  • possession of your furniture and other household goods;
  • possession of certain other items of personal property (for example, the tools you use for your work, your keys, checkbook or your daughter's wheelchair);
  • your court costs for the civil case paid for by the abuser or waived by the court, and your attorney's fees may be paid;
  • your rent or house payments, or other reasonable housing costs;
  • the abuser dispose of jointly owned or leased property; and
  • the abuser attend counseling programs designed to stop violent behavior.

2. Consider Your Children's Safety.

If you leave the residence, take your childrenwith you if you can. Be wary of leaving them withthe abuser. You may have delays in getting custodyof the children if they are left with the abuser. Ifyou have left the house and can come back to getthe children safely, do so.

3. Go to Court for Immediate Protection and Relief.

  • Prepare the Forms

The Clerk of the Court should be able togive you the appropriate forms to get started. Askfor a "Petition for Order of Protection." Indescribing the domestic violence against you in thepetition, start with the most recent episode ofviolence first; then go back in time with eachviolent episode. Add additional sheets if necessary.If the violence has caused any injuries such asbruises, knots or wounds, include that information inthe appropriate place on the petition. Also, beprepared to tell the judge about your injuries (andyour children's injuries). If the abuser is violentwhile using alcohol and illegal drugs, tell the judgein the complaint and remind him or her of it incourt. It is very important to show the judge onpaper why you are afraid now. The judge mayread your petition and may ask you more questionsin the courtroom, although some judges conductthese hearings informally in their offices. In thepetition, remember to ask for all the kinds of reliefyou want.

  • Have an Ex Parte Hearing

You should ask the judge to issue atemporary or ex parte order without contacting yourabuser. The order protects you while the summonsand complaint are being served by the sheriff on theabuser and before the abuser has the chance to comebefore the judge. The order is only good for fifteen(15) days, or until a full hearing on the matter canbe heard. The ex parte order will protect you in theevent your abuser attempts further contact with you.You must enforce it by calling the police if yourabuser attempts further contact with you. Thepolice must arrest an abuser who violates an exparte order.

4. Be Prepared for the Hearing for Full Order of Protection.

The full hearing with you, your witnesses,the abuser and the judge is held ten days after thesummons is issued and the complaint is filed,assuming the abuser has been served with yourpetition by then. The abuser must be served withthe summons at least five days prior to the hearingdate. The judge will be deciding what type of reliefhe or she should order for the next six to twelvemonths. It may be the same as the relief you got inthe temporary order or it may be different. Be sureyou bring with you to the courtroom any witnessesto the domestic violence against you and allevidence of the violence, such as pictures, medicalreports and clothing. Be prepared to describe to thejudge in detail what the abuser has done to you andwhy you are still afraid of him now.

If the papers are not served on the abuser bythe 10-day hearing, ask the judge or his/her clerk toextend the temporary, ex parte order and thatanother court date be assigned. The order ofprotection remains in effect for this period of timeso long as you have requested this relief and it wasgranted.

  • Ask the Judge for Relief

Be certain that you tell the judge exactlywhat relief you want. Make a list of all the kinds ofrelief you want and read it to the judge. If yourcircumstances have changed or if you have changedyour mind since you filed the petition, you canchange the type of relief requested.

The judge can (although he or she may not)order that you be provided with any of the reliefdescribed on pages 8-9 or some other form of relief.The judge can also order that the abuser not assaultor attempt to assault you, not harass or intimidateyou, not go to your work or residence and notfollow you around.

  • Keep Your Court Order

Once you obtain an order, keep it with you.The local law enforcement authorities must keepcopies of these orders on file, but you should keepa copy in your purse or other safe place near you sothat you can show the police or court that you havea domestic violence order should the abuser violateit.

5. Extend Your Court Order Before It Expires.

Your order for civil relief will only last forsix (6) months to one (1) year; the length is up tothe judge. You can get the order extended or obtainanother order beyond the original order if the abusercontinues to be a threat to your physical safety. Goto clerk of court's office for information on how toproceed, or you may wish to contact an attorney tohelp you. Be sure to apply for the renewal beforeyour order expires. Consult the index of services inthe back of this book, the Missouri Bar Association,or the clerk of court to determine what attorneys,including low-cost or volunteer attorneys, areavailable in your area to help get further help.

6. Abide by the Order.

There is no way that you can violate anOrder of Protection you have against someone else;however, if the judge has ordered the abuser not tocontact you, try to refrain from any telephone orpersonal contact with the abuser. Make the abuserabide by the order, and do not let the abuser talkyou into disregarding the order.

If you have let the abuser into your home(even if you have started living together again), youcan reapply for relief if further domestic violenceoccurs.

7. Get the Order Enforced if the Abuser Violates the Order.

Do not ignore the violation. You can andshould file a "motion for finding of contempt" assoon as possible after the abuser has violated theorder. Your safety may depend on you showing theabuser that you intend to enforce your legal rights.You can contact an attorney to file a motion forentry of contempt or you can file a motion yourself.Forms are available at the clerk of court's office.Again, you must write specifically what the abuserdid that was in violation of the order and you andthe abuser must appear before a judge. The judgemay tell the abuser that if he violates the order, hewill be jailed; or the judge may find that the orderhas already been violated and sentence the abuser tojail or order than he pay a fine. Be aware that aviolation of a court order is also a criminal offenseand that you can contact the police or theprosecuting attorney's office and have the abuserarrested immediately. The police should arrest theabuser if you show them you have a court order andthey reasonably believe that the abuser has violatedit.

WHEN YOU SEEK CIVIL RELIEF ORPRESS CRIMINAL CHARGES, FOLLOW THESE TIPS AND POINTERS . . .

1. File Civil and Criminal Charges Simultaneously.

You can press criminal charges and file acivil petition at the same time based on the sameincident.

2. Stay with Relatives or at a Shelter.

When you leave your home to get away fromthe abuser, stay with relatives, friends or at ashelter.

3. Go to the Hospital If You Are Injured.

Seek medical treatment if you are physicallyinjured. The hospital or doctor's office should makerecords of injuries. Get all medical documents andkeep them with you so they can be used in courtlater. Medical reports will be important evidence ateither a civil or criminal trial.

4. Seek Counseling.

You may find it helpful to talk with someoneoutside of your circle of family and friends. Seekcounseling from volunteers at a shelter or otherdomestic violence assistance program and get anydocuments or reports from your visit for use incourt later. Counseling may be important to yourrecovery from the domestic violence against you,and may help you sort out your feelings. Consultthe index at the end of this book for participatingagencies.

5. Be Organized In Court.

Know what you want to say to the judge.Most judges are busy; thus, you should tell him orher the most recent and most violent episodes first.Be aware that your abuser, or more likely his or hercounsel, can ask you questions in court. Keep calm,if you can. Remember, your sworn testimony maybe all the evidence you need to get civil relief or toget the abuser convicted.

6. Your Word is Good Evidence.

Your testimony may be all the evidence youneed. You do not have to have proof of injuries orwitnesses to the violence against you, but they arehelpful. Bring photographs of your bruises orfriends who saw the violence or the black eye if youcan. If you have been threatened with violence, tellthe judge why you are afraid of the threat. Do notget upset if the abuser contradicts what you say.Most judges have seen many cases of domesticviolence and will expect contradictions in thetestimony. If the judge believes you are truthful, heor she will give you some form of domesticviolence relief.

7. Provide for Your Financial Security.

After you are in a safe place, get money outof bank accounts to which you have access. Collectimportant personal belongings after you leave thehouse, if you can safely. Remember, the police canand should escort you back to your home to getyour belongings. Also, you can ask the judge for anorder allowing you to get the household goods andother personal things you need.

8. Call a Lawyer for Help with the System.

The Clerk of Court, or the Missouri BarAssociation may help you locate attorneys in yourarea who can help you file a civil petition, get atemporary order and advise you on how to presscriminal charges. Remember, you do not have to gothrough the legal system by yourself if you do notwant to.

Q: HOW DOES A VICTIM OF DOMESTICVIOLENCE PURSUE CRIMINAL REMEDIES?

As a victim of domestic violence, you canbring criminal charges, which will be prosecuted bythe State of Missouri through the local ProsecutingAttorney's office. The purpose is to punish yourabuser for violating the law.

To start a criminal proceeding, you should . . .

1. Report the Crime As Soon As Possible.

If you can get to a telephone, call the police.The police must respond to your call. If the policewitness the assault, they are required by law tomake an arrest on the spot. Of course, you shouldnever remain in a place of danger in order to allowthe police to witness the violence. The police alsohave an obligation to arrest if they have areasonable belief that you have been attacked orabused in some manner.

2. Be Prepared to Tell What Happened.

If the police do not witness the assault, youmay need to go to the Prosecuting Attorney's officeto press charges. You will need to describe to theProsecutor what happened to you and take alongwith you any witnesses to the domestic violence andany evidence of injury or abuse, including pictures,torn or blood-stained clothes and medical reports.Upon hearing your sworn testimony, the ProsecutingAttorney's office should press charges which willresult in the issuance of a criminal summons or awarrant. A criminal summons or warrant should beissued even if you do not have physical evidence ofabuse.

3. Know the Crimes and Charges.

  • Rape and Sexual Assault:

Sexual assault is the attempt to cause anotherto engage involuntarily in any sexual act by force,threat of force, or duress.

The crime of forcible rape is when a personhas sexual intercourse, which includes penetration,however slight, with you by use of force. Rape oran attempt to commit rape is a felony.

  • Assault:

A person commits the crime of assault if heor she attempts to kill or knowingly causes orattempts to cause serious injury to you. Assault inthe first degree is a felony. Assault in the seconddegree is also a felony, and includes attempts tocause serious physical injury under the influence ofsudden passion or by using a deadly weapon ordangerous instrument or if the person recklesslycauses serious injury or while a person isintoxicated or under the influence of drugs.

  • Communicating Threats - Harassment

A person is guilty of harassment against youif, for the purpose of frightening or disturbing you,he or she threatens to physically injure you ordamage your property, or to commit any felony, ormakes an offensive telephone call, or makesanonymous or repeated telephone calls.

  • Stalking

The offense of stalking occurs when a personpurposely and repeatedly harasses or follows youwith the intent to harass you. To be illegal, stalkingmust occur over a period of time, showing a patternof conduct and continued purpose. The course ofconduct must be such that it would cause areasonable person to suffer substantial emotionaldistress, and must actually cause substantialemotional distress to you.

  • Harassing Phone Calls

Using profane, indecent or threateninglanguage against you over the telephone or on youranswering machine is illegal. This includesannoying or harassing you by making falsestatements over the telephone or by repeated calling.

4. Be Prepared for the Criminal Trial.

  • The Court Date

You need to keep track of the date which isset for trial, and be sure to go to court at the righttime that day ready to testify about the details of theviolence against you.

  • The Prosecuting Attorney is Your Attorney

You do not need to hire an attorney since theprosecuting attorney represents your interests. Youshould contact the prosecuting attorney's officebefore the trial date to discuss the case and theevidence which you will be able to present. If thereare any witnesses to the domestic violence againstyou, you should let the prosecuting attorney knowas soon as possible and request that they besubpoenaed to appear at the trial. You should givethe prosecuting attorney the names and badgenumbers of the police officers who arrested theabuser or who responded to your call.

  • Possible Continuances

Criminal cases are routinely continued forseveral weeks or even months in order to allow theabuser (defendant) to hire an attorney or tosubpoena witnesses. It is important to keep track ofthe date on which the case is scheduled to returnand, once again, to go to court at the appropriatetime that day.

  • The Punishment

If the defendant is found guilty, thepunishment will depend on the circumstances of thecase. The decision is up to the judge, but the judgewill consider the prosecuting attorney'srecommendation and other factors such as whetherthe defendant has done this before. If the crime isserious enough, the abuser could be sentenced to along prison term. In the typical domestic violencecase, however, the abuser will be found guilty of amisdemeanor and will receive a suspended sentence,a fine and/or probation. Depending on thecircumstances of the case, you may want to ask thecourt to order the abuser to undergo counseling,substance abuse counseling and/or to stay awayfrom you.

5. Follow These Tips and Pointers . . .

  • Do not press criminal charges if you are notgoing to follow through. Remember that if youdrop the charges, the court and police are less likelyto believe you the next time. If you do not appearon the day scheduled for trial, your case may bedismissed.
  • Be present and ready to have all witnessesavailable on short notice. Cooperate with theprosecuting attorney and tell him or her everythingyou can remember about the domestic violenceagainst you.
  • If the abuser attacks you again (after he hasbeen found guilty), take out another warrant fortheir arrest and report the attack to his probationofficer.

Q: HOW CAN AN ELDERLY VICTIM OF VIOLENCE GET HELP?

1. What is Elder Abuse?

Elderly adults are also subject to abuse.Elderly adults have the same personal right to befree of abuse as other members of society. Abuseof the elderly can be physical or psychological innature.

  • One common form of abuse of the elderly isphysical neglect. As people become older theysometimes become dependent on others to helpthem perform tasks required for everyday living.For instance, elderly adults may become dependenton others to clean and maintain their homes, bringthem food and medicine, and to help them maintaintheir personal cleanliness. If the abuser stopsperforming these necessary tasks, the elderly adultbecomes a victim of physical neglect.
  • Another common form of abuse of theelderly occurs when an abuser obtains money andproperty from an elderly adult through deceit,schemes or threats. The elderly adult may be forcedto give up property or money because of threats orintimidation. While the abuser may threatenphysical harm, more commonly the abuser threatensto deny the elderly adult a need or comfort such asfood, clothing, transportation or access to family andfriends. The abuser may also threaten to have theelderly person put in an institution or home if theproperty or money is not given to the abuser.

Fortunately, while it does occur, physicalabuse, such as a beating, is not as common amongthe elderly. But intimidation, verbal abuse, denialof necessary care and isolation can make the elderlyadult s life miserable.

2. How Does the Law Protect the Elderly?

  • Orders of Protection.

There are laws that protect elderly orhandicapped individuals from abuse. The MissouriAdult Abuse Act applies to all adults over the ageof eighteen. The provisions of this act are discussedin depth in this handbook (pages 1-23). The AdultAbuse laws apply equally to the elderly orhandicapped.

  • The Elderly Adult Protection Services Act.

As the problem of abuse of the elderlyreceived more attention and study, the MissouriGeneral Assembly passed the Elderly AdultProtection Services Act. The primary goal of thislaw is to end abuse of the elderly. The law is alsodesigned to assist the elderly in their efforts to liveand function in the community.

The most important aspects of this law is theavailability of a free hotline number (1-800-392-0210 or 1-800-235-5503 for aging information andreferrals) that any abuse victim or concernedperson may call to report an abusive incident. If acall is received, the Department of Social Serviceswill become involved and either investigate theabuse, refer the report to local law enforcementofficials, provide the abused person with services, orrefer the caller to local community agencies thatprovide services.

A major problem for the elderly has been thedifficulty in understanding or identifying abusivebehavior and then stopping that abuse. The elderlyadult, like any victim of abuse, often suffers alone,and only with courage and outside help will theabuse end.

  • Persons Protected by the Act.

To qualify for protection under this Act a person must be:

1. Sixty years of age or older; or

2. A handicapped person between theages of eighteen and fifty-nine who is not able toprotect his or her own interests; or who cannotadequately perform or obtain services that arenecessary to meet his or her essential human needs.

  • Reporting Abuse or Neglect.

Any person who has reason to suspect thatan elderly or handicapped adult is in a situation thatpresents likelihood of suffering serious physicalharm and is in need of protective services shouldreport that information to the Missouri Departmentof Social Services. Certain professionals arerequired by law to report abuse or neglect of theelderly person. The Department s Division of Aginghas toll-free hotline for receiving such reports.

Hotline for Reporting Abuse of the Elderly
1-800-392-0210
or
for Information on Aging and Referrals
1-800-235-5503

The Act provides that a likelihood of seriousphysical harm exists when:

  1. The person is unable to provide for his orher own essential needs;
  2. The person may cause physical harm tohimself or herself;
  3. Another person will physically harm theprotected person; or
  4. The person has suffered physical injury,neglect, sexual or emotional abuse, or othermistreatment, or wasting of his or her financialresources by the abuser.
  • Investigation Procedures.

After getting the report of abuse, theDepartment of Social Services must promptlyinvestigate whether the elderly person is in need ofprotective services. If the person is found to be inneed of protective services, the Department mustassist the person in getting the needed services,including alternative housing if necessary.

In order to protect the privacy of the abusedelderly or handicapped adult, the reports andinvestigative records are closed (confidential)records. These records are available only tospecified persons employed by the state.

  • Seeking Relief.

In addition to the Adult Abuse Act and theElderly Adult Protective Services Act, Missouri hasenacted criminal statutes designed to protect elderlyMissourians. If you are aware of an elderly personwho is being abused, contact the police, the localprosecutor s office, and the Department of SocialServices hotline number.

DOMESTIC VIOLENCE RESOURCES

Look in the blue pages of the phone book tofind the Clerk of Court for your county and thelocation of the courthouse. The Clerk of Court is auseful resource for pursuing your rights. You mayalso find in the first few pages of the "white pages"phone book a phone number for a women's shelteror agency. In addition, more resources are listed onthe following pages. This index is organized byregions of the State. Locate your region and theindex lists various services available to you andyour family.
National Domestic Violence Hotline
(800) 799-SAFE (7233)
or
TDD (800) 787-3224

CENTRAL REGION

September 1996

Shelters/Safehomes

ACCIS-AUDRAIN CO. CRISIS INTERVENTION SERVICES
Karen Johnson
P.O. Box 181
Mexico, MO 65265
(573) 581-3835 (Office)
(573) 581-0994 (Fax)
(573) 581-2280 (Hotline)

Services:
shelter, safehomes, counseling, legal/court advocacy, support groups,referrals

Counties Serving:

Audrain, Montgomery, North Callaway and Pike Counties

CITIZENS AGAINST DOMESTIC VIOLENCE-SUNSHINE HOUSE
Christine Eiskant
Lynn Richards
P.O. Box 245
Camdenton, MO 65020
(573) 346-9630 (Office and Fax)
(573) 346-2238 (Hotline)

Services:
shelter, safehomes, legal/court advocacy, counseling, referrals,community education, abusers' groups, children's services

Counties Serving:
Camden, Laclede, Miller and Morgan Counties

NEW START-A DOMESTIC VIOLENCE SHELTER
Teresa Blackmore
P.O. Box 204
New Franklin, MO 65274
(816) 882-2400 (Office)
(800) 479-0522 (Hotline)

Services:
shelter, counseling, legal/court advocacy, support groups, transportation, daycare

Counties Serving:
Cooper and Howard Counties

PULASKI COUNTY CRISIS CENTER
Judy Corse
Judy Miller
P.O. Box 4177
Waynesville, MO 65583
(573) 774-6012 (Office)
(573) 774-2628 (Hotline)

Services:
shelter, counseling, support groups, legal/court advocacy, transitional housing,children's services, employment assistance

Counties Serving:
Pulaski and Surrounding Counties

RAPE & ABUSE CRISIS SERVICE
Dr. Pat Allen
Linda Amick
P.O. Box 416
Jefferson City, MO 65102
(573) 634-8346 (Office)
(573) 659-8508 (Fax)
(573) 634-4911 (Hotline)

Services:
shelter, legal/court advocacy, counseling, children's services, resource library,community education/ training, support groups

Counties Serving:
Cole, Gasconade, Maries, Miller, Moniteau, Morgan, Osage, SouthernCallaway and Southern Boone Counties

SAFE PASSAGES
Beverly Knapp
P.O. Box 456
Moberly, MO 65270
(816) 269-8999 (Office)
(816) 269-8111 (Hotline)

Services:
shelter, crisis intervention, legal advocacy, peer counseling

Counties Serving:
Randolph and surrounding counties

THE RUSSELL HOUSE-PHELPS CO. FAMILY CRISIS SERVICES, INC.
Tammy Mathews
Connie Woody
P.O. Box 2259
Rolla, MO 65402
(573) 364-0579 (Office)
(573) 364-0222 (Hotline)

Services:
shelter, legal/court advocacy, transportation, counseling, referrals, children'sservices, support groups, parenting group

Counties Serving:
Crawford, Dent, Maries and Phelps Counties

THE SHELTER
Pat Glasier
Wanda Thatcher
P.O. Box 1367
Columbia, MO 65205
(573) 875-1369 (Office)
(573) 874-8608 (Fax)
(573) 875-1370 (Hotline)
(800) 548-2480 (Hotline)

Services:
shelter, legal/court advocacy, counseling, support groups, children's groups,community and professional education

Counties Serving:
Audrain, Boone, Callaway, Chariton, Cooper, Howard, Montgomery, Randolphand Saline Counties

TURNING POINT
Martie Hemphill
P.O. Box 426
Warrenton, MO 63383
(314) 709-0260 (Office)
(314) 709-7233 (Hotline)

Services:
shelter, crisis intervention, legal advocacy, support groups, referrals, outreachand education, transportation and follow-up

Counties Serving:
Warren County

Related Services

FAMILY COUNSELING CENTER OF MISSOURI
Allen Tacker
Shari Melton
117 N. Garth
Columbia, MO 65203
(573) 449-2581 (Office)
(573) 875-6607 (Fax)

Services:
counseling for men, women and children

Counties Serving:
Boone and Cole Counties

Organizing for Services

COALITION AGAINST RAPE AND DOMESTIC VIOLENCE
Marcy Campbell
P.O. Box 786
Fulton, MO 65251
(314) 642-7206

Services:
safehomes, hotline, legal/court advocacy, support groups, community education

Counties Serving:
Callaway County

KANSAS CITY REGION

September 1996
Kansas City Metropolitan Area1-800-995-1000

Shelters/Safehomes

HOPE HOUSE
Susan Else
Mary Ann Metheny
P.O. Box 520409
Independence, MO 64052
(816) 461-4188 (Office)
(800) 995-1000 (Hotline)
(816) 461-8429 (Fax)

Services:
shelter, crisis intervention, legal/court advocacy, counseling, support groups,children's services, transitional housing, outreach office, speakers bureau,life skills program

Counties Serving:
Eastern Jackson County

NEWHOUSE
Leslie Caplan
Nancy Brown
P.O. Box 240019
Kansas City, MO 64124
(816) 231-7378 (Office)
(816) 231-1909 (Fax)
(816) 241-0311 (Hotline)

Shelter Phones:
(816) 843-6140 (Office)
(816) 483-2920 (Fax)

Services:
shelter, legal/court advocacy, counseling, children'sservices, substance abuse programs, support group, child care, outreachoffice, transitional housing

Counties Serving:
Jackson County

ROSE BROOKS CENTER
Susan Miller
Lisa Fleming
P.O. Box 10453
Kansas City, MO 64171-0453
(816) 523-5550 (Office)
(816) 523-8177 (Fax)
(816) 995-1000 (Hotline)

Services:
shelter, crisis intervention, legal advocacy, support groups, counseling forwomen and children, day care, outreach office

Counties Serving:
Jackson County

SAFEHAVEN
Jan Kauk
Cathy Asher
230 N.E. Evansdale Road
Kansas City, MO 64116-2623
(816) 454-3581 (Adm./Main)
(816) 453-3233 (Fax)
(816) 995-1000 (Hotline)
(816) 458-7200 (Outreach)

Services:
shelter, crisis intervention, legal advocacy, support groups, counseling forwomen, children and men, transitional housing, community and professionaleducation

Counties Serving:
Clay, Platte, Ray, Caldwell, Carroll, Clinton and Lafayette Counties

PROJECT ASSIST LEGAL AID OF WESTERN MO
Kelley Rice
Richard Halliburton
1125 Grand Blvd.
Kansas City, MO 64106-2503
(816) 474-1413 (Office)

Services:
legal services, legal advocacy, representation for orders of protection, policetraining

Counties Serving:
Kansas City Metropolitan Area

JACKSON COUNTY VICTIM SERVICES PROGRAM
Megan Carter
Jackson County Courthouse
415 E. 12th, 11th Floor
Kansas City, MO 64106
(816) 881-3555 (Office)
(816) 881-3843 (Fax)

Services:
legal/court advocacy, information and referrals, crime victim compensation

Counties Serving:
Jackson County

BELTON VICTIM ADVOCATE UNIT
Capt. Don Spears
Pam Seaver
Belton Police Dept.
7001 E. 163rd Street
911 Emergency
(816) 331-5522 (Office)

Services:
motel placement, legal and court advocacy, referrals

Counties Serving:
Cass County

NORTHEAST REGION

September 1996
AVENUES
Linda McCalister
Madonna Petitjean
P.O. Box 284
Hannibal, MO 63401
(573) 221-2093 (Office)
(573) 221-7022 (Fax)
(573) 221-4280 (Hotline)
(800) 678-7713 (Hotline)

Services:
shelter, legal/court advocacy, counseling, referrals, sexual assaultintervention and advocacy

Counties Serving:
Clark, Lewis, Marion, Monroe, Pike and Ralls Counties

PEOPLE AGAINST DOMESTIC VIOLENCE
Judy Hereford
P.O. Box 423
Union, MO 63084
(314) 583-8443 (Office)

Services:
safehomes, support groups, legal/court advocacy, counseling

VICTIM SUPPORT SERVICES, INC.
Kim LeBaron
Alice Davis
213 W. Washington Street
Kirksville, MO 63501
(816) 665-0021 (Office)
(816) 665-0020 (Fax)
(800) 665-1617 (Hotline)
(816) 665-1617 (Hotline)

Services:
shelter, crisis intervention, advocacy, legal/court advocacy, counseling, referral,women's group, outreach office

Counties Serving:
Adair, Knox, Lewis, Macon, Putnam, Schuyler, Scotland, Clarkand Sullivan Counties

"TURNING POINT" -- WARREN COUNTY COUNCIL AGAINST DOMESTIC VIOLENCE
P.O. Box 426
Warrenton, MO 63383
(314) 709-0260 (Office)
(314) 709-7233 (Hotline)

Services:
shelter, legal/court advocacy, transports, referrals, children's services, women'scounseling, support groups, counseling, transitional housing

Counties Serving:
Franklin, Gasconade, Lincoln, Montgomery and Warren Counties

CASA, INC.
Kathy Smith
Diane Morrison
P.O. Box 1371
Sedalia, MO 63501
(816) 827-5559 (Office)
(816) 827-5548 (Fax)
(816) 827-5555 (Hotline)
(800) 894-1151 (Hotline)

Services:
shelter, crisis intervention, legal/court advocacy, counseling, referrals, supportgroups, children's services, non-resident services and follow-up program

Counties Serving:
Benton, Cooper, Lafayette, Pettis, Morganand Saline Counties

FAITH
The Anne Molini Fitch Memorial Shelter
Tracy Trumble
1007 S. Second St., Box 9
Clinton, MO 64735
(816) 885-6067 (Office)
(816) 821-5073 (Hotline)

Services:
shelter, crisis intervention, court advocacy, transportation,parenting information

Counties Serving:
Henry and St. Clair Counties

SURVIVAL
Adult Abuse, Inc.
Dave Garner
Karen
P.O. Box 344
Warrensburg,
MO 64093
(816) 429-1088 (Office)
(816) 429-1088 (Fax)

Services:
shelter, crisis intervention, legal advocacy, support groups

Counties Serving:
Johnson County

NORTH CENTRAL MISSOURI WOMEN'S ABUSE SHELTER
Virginia Daniels
P.O. Box 30
Trenton, MO 64683
(816) 359-3297 (Office)
(816) 359-4129 (Fax)
(800) 942-0649 (Hotline)

Services:
advocacy and referral

Counties Serving:
Caldwell, Davies, Grundy, Harrison, Linn, Livingston, Mercer, Putnam andSullivan Counties

YWCA WOMEN'S SHELTER
Diana Taylor
Mary Gilchrist
304 N. 8th
St. Joseph, MO 64501
(816) 232-4481 (Office)
(800) 653-1477 (Hotline)
(816) 232-1225 (Hotline)

Services:
shelter, legal/court advocacy, counseling, referrals, children's services, supportgroups, men's counseling and support groups, education program, child care

Counties Serving:
Andrew, Buchanan, Clinton, DeKalb and Nodaway Counties

HOPE HAVEN OF CASS COUNTY
Amy Taylor
Gerri Jackson
P.O. Box 754
Harrisonville, MO 64701
(816) 380-4663 (Office)
(800) 380-4663 (Hotline)

Services:
shelter, legal advocacy, counseling for women and children, outreach services

Counties Serving:
Cass and Bates Counties

Organizing for Services

GENTRY/WORTH COUNTIES HELP LINE
Rev. Sandra Crater
302 North Smith
Albany, MO 64402
(816) 726-5828 (Office)

Services:
organizing help line and women's support group

HOUSE OF HOPE, INC.
Shirley A. Guevel
1001 Main Street
Lexington, MO 64067

SOUTHEAST REGION

1995

Shelters/Safehomes

CASA GUADALUPE
Lois Martens
Anne Francioni
P.O. Box 417
Ellington, MO 63638
(573) 663-2720 (Hotline and Office)

Services:
shelter, safehomes, legal/court advocacy, counseling, support groups, children's services, transitional housing, outreach services, parenting classes

Counties Serving:
Carter, Iron, Reynolds and Wayne Counties

THE LIBERTY SHELTER-THE CENTER FOR FAMILY RESOURCES
Kathie Miller
Faye Dockins
P.O. Box 207
Malden, MO 63863
(573) 276-5500 (Office and Fax)
(573) 276-2955 (Hotline)

Services:
shelter, legal advocacy, counseling, children's groups, support groups,referrals, men's counseling, parenting classes, outreach services

Counties Serving:
Dunklin, Mississippi, New Madrid, Pemiscot, Scottand Stoddard Counties

HAVEN HOUSE, INC.
Mary Ann Allen
Nancy Stewart
P.O. Box 4875
Poplar Bluff, MO 63901
(573) 686-4873 (Office)
(573) 686-6416 (Fax)
(800) 491-1138 (Hotline)

Services:
shelter, counseling, support groups, social services advocacy, transportation

Counties Serving:
Butler, Carter, Ripley, Stoddardand Wayne Counties

SAFE HOUSE FOR WOMEN, INC.
Bonnie Gerecke
Debra Willis-Hamilton
P.O. Box 1167
Cape Girardeau, MO 63702
(573) 335-7745 (Office)
(573) 335-6435 (Fax)
(573) 651-1614 (Hotline)

Services:
shelter, legal/court advocacy, counseling, support groups, children's services,local transportation, food/clothing assistance and referrals

Counties Serving:
Cape Girardeau, Dunklin, New Madrid, Reynolds and Stoddard Counties

NEW WAY SHELTER SOUTHEAST MISSOURI FAMILY VIOLENCE COUNCIL
Mary Ann Taylor
Mary Pyatt
P.O. Box 934
Farmington, MO 63640
(573) 358-3913 (Office)
(800) 663-9929 (Hotline)
(573) 358-3913 (Fax - call first)

Services:
safehomes, support groups, temp. shelter, legal/ court advocacy, parentinggroups, community education, sexual assault crisis intervention and shelter

Counties Serving:
Iron, Madison, St. Francois, Ste. Genevieve and Washington Counties

PERRY COUNTY WOMEN'S CRISIS CENTER
Michelle Riehn
Janice Lundy
434 North West
Perryville, MO 63775
(573) 547-2480 (Office)
(573) 547-2536 (Fax)
(573) 547-0737 (Hotline)

Services:
shelter, crisis intervention, legal/court advocacy, women/children counseling,community education

Counties Serving:
Perry County

EPWORTH BOOTHEEL FAMILY LEARNING CENTER
Dr. Martha Black, Ph.D.
Mary Robinson
P.O. Box 249
East Prairie, MO 63845
(573) 649-3731 (Office)
(573) 649-5028 (Fax)

Services:
shelter, crisis intervention, legal advocacy, support groups, counseling, day care

Counties Serving:
Mississippi County

Organizing for Services

RIPLEY COUNTY FAMILY VIOLENCE COUNSEL
Diane E. Groves
Nancy Powell
Route 2, Box 20
Doniphan, MO 63935
(573) 996-2175 (Office)
(573) 996-2238 (Fax)

Services:
motel placement, support group, transportation, victim mentor program

Counties Serving:
Ripley County

ST. LOUIS METROPOLITAN REGION

September 1996

Shelters/Safehomes

ST. MARTHA'S HALL
Michelle Schiller-Baker
Chris Heckendorn
P.O. Box 4950
St. Louis, MO 63108
(314) 533-1313 (Office and Hotline)
(314) 533-2035 (Fax)

Services:
shelter, legal/court advocacy, children's services, counseling, supportgroups, community education

Counties Serving:
St. Louis City and County, St. Charles and Jefferson Counties

FORTRESS OUTREACH
Irma Jenkins
P.O. Box 2115
Florissant, MO 63032-2115
(314) 653-1500 (Office)
(314) 921-8398 (Fax)
(314) 381-4422 (Hotline)

Services:
safehomes, counseling, support groups, children's counseling, transitionalhousing, outreach services

Counties Serving:
St. Louis County North

KATHY J. WEINMAN SHELTER FOR ABUSED WOMEN
Michelle Schiller-Baker
Chris Heckendorn
P.O. Box 5852
St. Louis, MO 63134
(314) 423-1117 (Office and Hotline)
(314) 423-7537 (Fax)

Services:
shelter, counseling, legal/court advocacy, children's services, support groups,community education

Counties Serving:
St. Louis City and County, St. Charles and Jefferson Counties

THE WOMEN'S CENTER
Meg Schnabel
Peggy Krash
P.O. Box 51
St. Charles, MO 63302
(314) 946-6854 (Office and Hotline)
(314) 946-6897 (Fax)

Services:
shelter, counseling, legal/court advocacy, children's services, supportgroups

Counties Serving:
Lincoln, St. Charles, St. Louis and Warren Counties

THE WOMEN'S SAFEHOUSE
Margaret Caven
Eloise Golden
P.O. Box 63010
St. Louis, MO 63163
(314) 772-4535 (Office and Hotline)
(314) 772-8952 (Fax - call first)

Services:
shelter, advocacy, court escort, children's services, support groups

Counties Serving:
St. Louis City and County

Counseling Services and Sexual Assault Services

ALIVE, INC.
Elizabeth Stoodley
Jessica Sloan-McCoy
P.O. Box 11201
St. Louis, MO 63105
(314) 993-7080 (Office)
(314) 567-5629 (Fax)
(314) 993-2777 (Hotline)

Services:
crisis intervention, legal/court advocacy, individual counseling, support groups

Counties Serving:
St. Louis City and County and St. Charles County

WOMEN'S SELF HELP CENTER
Barbara Bennett
Kathleen Sharkey
2838 Olive
St. Louis, MO 63103
(314) 531-9100 (Office)
(314) 531-3449 (Fax)
(314) 531-2003 (Hotline)

Services:
crisis intervention, sexual assault/domestic violence counseling, communityeducation

Counties Serving:
St. Louis City and County, Jefferson and St. Charles Counties

LIFE SOURCE CONSULTANTS
Gloria Johnson, Ph.D.
Joanna Johnson
P.O. Box 5752
St. Louis, MO 63121-0752
(314) 385-8588 (Office)
(314) 385-8364 (Fax)
(314) 385-8686 (Hotline)

Services:
crisis intervention, counseling, support groups, outreach, education

Counties Serving:
St. Louis Metro Area, St. Louis County, St. Charles

SOUTHSIDE WOMEN'S CENTER
C.J. Brotherton
2632a Iowa
St. Louis, MO 63118
(314) 776-6727 (Office)
(314) 569-1399 (Fax)

Services:
sexual assault and domestic violence counseling, legal/court advocacy, supportgroups, community education, referrals, day care, conflict resolution servicesand training, education for parenting, career and health issues

Counties Serving:
St. Louis City and County, East St. Louis, Belleville, St. Charles and JeffersonCounties

YWCA: WOMEN'S RESOURCE CENTER
Pat Randall
140 N. Brentwood Blvd.
Clayton, MO 63105
(314) 776-6665 (Office)
(314) 727-1372 (Fax)

Services:
counseling, sexual assault, victim assistance, family counseling, supportgroups, school-based group for teen parents, hospital crisis intervention andfollow-up

Counties Serving:
St. Louis City and County

WOMEN'S COUNSELING COLLECTIVE
Kim Anderson
Debra Kuhn
7818 Forsyth, Suite 209
St. Louis, MO 63105
(314) 727-4152 (Office)
(314) 727-4157 (Fax)

Services:
counseling, sexual assault and domestic violence, legal advocacy, supportgroups

Counties Serving:
St. Louis City and County

Legal Advocacy/Court Based Services

LAAW-LEGAL ADVOCATES FOR ABUSED WOMEN
Lynn Rothbarth
Jennifer Mathis
3115 South Grand Avenue Suite 102
St. Louis, MO 63118
(314) 664-7465 (Office)
(314) 664-7412 (Fax)
(314) 664-7475 (Hotline)
(800) 527-1460 (Hotline)

Services:
legal representation and court advocacy, crisis intervention, referrals,community outreach

Counties Serving:
Franklin, Jefferson, St. Charles, St. Louis City and County, Warren andWashington Counties

LASTING SOLUTIONS LEGAL SERVICES OF EASTERN MISSOURI
Anne Hegeman
4232 Forest Park
St. Louis, MO 63108
(314) 534-4200 (Office)
(314) 534-1028 (Fax)
(800) 444-0514 (Hotline)

Services:
legal/court advocacy, counseling, referrals

Counties Serving:
St. Louis extended region

ST. CHARLES VICTIM OF CRIME ASSISTANCE PROGRAM
Maggie Lipman
Ann Kuhn
300 N. Second Street
St. Charles, MO 63301
(314) 949-7370 (Office)
(314) 949-7360 (Fax)

Services:
advocacy, sexual assault and DV counseling, legal/court advocacy, women'scounseling/group counseling

Counties Serving:
St. Charles County

ST. LOUIS CIRCUIT ATTORNEY'S OFFICE- VICTIM SERVICES
Kim Norman
JoAnn Miller
1320 Market, Room 222
St. Louis, MO 63103
(314) 622-4373 (Office)
(314) 622-3369 (Fax)

Services:
court advocacy, counseling, referral, children's groups, men's counseling,witness relocation, assistance with victim compensation reimbursementemergency fund, court escorts, internship program

Counties Serving:
St. Louis City

VICTIM SERVICE COUNCIL
Kathleen Tofall
Allyn Hoke
7900 Carondelet, 4th Floor
St. Louis, MO 63105
(314) 889-3075 (Office)
(314) 854-7590 (Fax)

Services:
legal/court advocacy, assistance with orders of protection, crisis intervention,referrals

Counties Serving:
St. Louis County

Related Services

AWARE
Sue Dersch
c/o Women's Education Services, Barnes Hospital
#1 Barnes Hospital Plaza
St. Louis, MO 63110
(314) 362-9273 (Office)
(314) 362-3946 (Fax)
(314) 453-2227 (Pager)

Services:
hospital based advocacy for domestic violence, counseling for women,education for hospital staff and health care professionals, referrals

Counties Serving:
St. Louis Metro Area, St. Louis County, St. Charles and Jefferson Counties

NATIONAL CENTER FOR VIOLENCE PREVENTION
Geri Redden
3500 Giles
St. Louis, MO 63116
(314) 771-1116 (Office)
(314) 771-1593 (Fax)

Services:
education and training programs concerning family violence and related issues

Counties Serving:
St. Louis and State of Missouri

HAVEN
Sidney Kendall
Pat Janowski
c/o F.V.C. Church
1325 N. Highway 67
Florissant, MO 63031
(314) 837-6767 (Office)

Services:
supporting organization for the Kathy J. Weinman Shelter and educationalgroup, also provides community training

Counties Serving:
St. Louis City and North St. Louis County

LYDIA'S HOUSE, INC.
Mary Albert
Martha Brunell
P.O. Box 2722
St. Louis, MO 63116
(314) 865-3040

Services:
transitional housing, support group for women, spiritual support group

Counties Serving:
St. Louis City

SOCIAL CONCERNS/AGING CONSULTANTS
Rebecca Rengo
Debbie Emmelkemp
10425 Old Olive St. Rd. #7
Creve Coeur, MO 63141
(314) 997-7578 (Office)
(314) 997-7578 (Fax)
(314) 997-7278 (Hotline)

Services:
in-home counseling care management for persons with disabilities and olderwomen and men

Counties Serving:
St. Louis City and County, Jefferson, Franklin and St. Charles CountiesCounties

Services for Men

RAVEN
Mark Moloney
Teresa Willis
Susan Wise
Mary Sue Guenther
7314 Manchester
2nd Floor
St. Louis, MO 63143
(314) 645-2492 (Office)
(314) 645-2075 (Hotline)

Services:
batterer's intervention services, support group, counseling for men who batter,community education

Counties Serving:
St. Louis City and County, Franklin, Jefferson Counties and Edwardsville,Madison, St. Clair Counties, Illinois

ALTERNATIVES TO VIOLENCE AND ABUSE THE WOMEN'S CENTER
Jim Read
Meg Schnabel
P.O. Box 51
St. Charles, MO 63302
(314) 949-9940 (Office)

Services:
intervention and education, classes for batterers, community education, in-service training and workshops

Counties Serving:
St. Charles, St. Louis, Lincoln and Warren Counties

SOUTHWEST REGION

September 1996

Shelters/Safehomes

AGAPE HOUSE
Joan Smith Lawson
Rita Cunningham
P.O. Box 550
Mountain View, MO 65548
(417) 934-1811 (Office and Hotline)

Services:
shelter, counseling, support groups, children's services, transportation,parenting classes

Counties Serving:
Howell, Ozark, Douglas, Oregon, Shannon, Texas and Wright Counties

CHRISTOS HOUSE
Pat Jones
Kathy Barron
P.O. Box 771
West Plains, MO 65775
(417) 256-9255 (Hotline)
(417) 257-3289 (Fax)

Services:
shelter, legal/court advocacy, counseling, support groups, children's services

Counties Serving:
Douglas, Howell, Oregon, Ozark, Shannon, Texas and Wright Counties

COPE-COUNCIL FOR THE PREVENTION OF FAMILY VIOLENCE
Dorothy Dewitt
Joy Turner
P.O. Box 1281
Lebanon, MO 65536
(417) 532-2885 (Office)
(417) 588-9773 (Hotline)

Services:
shelter, legal/court advocacy, support groups, community education, counseling

Counties Serving:
Laclede, Dallas, Camden and Pulaski Counties

FAMILY VIOLENCE CENTER, INC.
Stella Harrison
P.O. Box 5972
Springfield, MO 65801
(417) 837-7700 (Office)
(417) 837-7707 (Fax)
(417) 837-7777 (Hotline)
(800) 831-6863 (Hotline)

Services:
shelter, community education, children's services, support groups, legal/courtadvocacy, counseling

Counties Serving:
Cedar, Christian, Dade, Dallas, Douglas, Greene, Laclede, Lawrence, Ozark,Phelps, Polk, Stone, Taney, Texas, Webster and Wright Counties

HARBOR LIGHTS
Laurie Domsch
Dee Stott
P.O. Box 398
Kimberling City, MO 65686
(417) 739-2118 (Office)
(417) 739-5883 (Fax)
(800) 831-6863 (Hotline)

Services:
safehomes, legal/court advocacy, counseling, support groups, communityeducation, transitional housing, outreach office

Counties Serving:
Stone and Taney Counties

LAFAYETTE HOUSE
Dr. Sherry Gant, Ph.D.
Alison Malinowski
1809 Connor
Joplin, MO 64804
(417) 782-1772 (Office)
(417) 782-3832 (Fax)
(800) 416-1772 (Hotline)

Services:
shelter, rape crisis, counseling, referral, children's services, communityeducation, legal/court advocacy, support groups, day care, outreach office,batterers' groups

Counties Serving:
Barry, Barton, Dade, Jasper, Lawrence, McDonald and Newton Counties

MOSS HOUSE-COUNCIL ON FAMILIES IN CRISIS
Martha Sander
Julie Leonard
415 N. Main
Nevada, MO 64772
(417) 667-7171 (Office)
(800) 398-4271 (Hotline)

Services:
shelter, referrals, legal/court advocacy, counseling, community education,children's services, support groups, education, outreach office

Counties Serving:
Barton, Bates, Cedar, Dade, St. Clair and Vernon Counties

WOMEN'S CRISIS CENTER OF TANEY COUNTY
Sandra Patton
P.O. Box 282
Branson, MO 65615
(417) 335-5181 (Office)
(417) 335-3197 (Hotline)

Services:
safehomes, referrals, support groups, advocacy, counseling, outreach office,transportation

Counties Serving:
Taney County

MARY SHAW BUTLER SHELTER FOR HICKORY COUNTY
Patty Koehler
Brad Coates
P.O. Box 402
Hermitage, MO 65668
(417) 745-2146 (Office)
(417) 745-2267 (Fax)

Services:
safehomes, legal/court advocacy, support groups

Counties Serving:
Hickory, S. Benton, E. St. Clair, N. Polk and W. Dallas Counties

Related Services

LAKES COUNTRY REHABILITATION CENTER
Roberta Routh
2626 W. College Road
Springfield, MO 65802
(417) 862-1753 (Office)
(417) 864-5621 (Fax)

Services:
substance abuse counseling statewide

Organizing for Services

NEIGHBORS AGAINST VIOLENT BEHAVIOR
Donna K. Brengle
101 W. Church, Apt. B
Ozark, MO 65721
(417) 581-7392

Services:
organizing education programs for schools

We gratefully acknowledge the Young Lawyer
Division of The North Carolina Bar Association
Who So Graciously Allowed Us To Replicate
Their brochure.
The Young Lawyers Section of
The Missouri Bar
Invite And Endorse The Reproduction
And Distribution Of This brochure
By Any Person Or Organization
Please Do So Freely.


The Missouri Bar, P.O. Box 119, Jefferson City, MO 65102-0119